Thursday, March 09, 2006

(Stupid) Question

for Simon DeDeo

Has Drew Gardner accomplished with Flarf what Tao Lin was unable to accomplish with a litany?

7 comments:

The majority of people said...

No.

Fran said...

...I keep coming across that Flarf word lately. What does it represent?

Fran said...

Okay--I read your Contra Flarphilia post and followed a link that explained flarf. I kept hearing people talk around the term, but I couldn't figure out its specific definition from the context of those discussions.

Thomas Basbøll said...

Just a quick worry on my part here:

You don't mean you let Dan Hoy's essay "explain Flarf" to you, do you? It's up to you of course, but it is by no means my recommendation. The best thing you can do, as a start, is to read the selection of poems in Jacket 30.

Fran said...

Ooops--I was operating on much too little sleep yesterday. I know that's likely only "an" explanation from that person's subjective perspective. Didn't mean to imply otherwise. I'm not really crazy about dogmatic definitions and wasn't necessarily looking for one--that's another thing I didn't mean to imply/say. I just hadn't come across "specifics" of any kind about flarf.

Do you personally think the collage description/discussion in the Hoy essay is incorrect? I think that description sounds interesting because I do (and love) visual-art collages.

Fran said...

Those Jacket 30 poems are funny; they sound satirical and bizarre to me. I think that if anything demands a bizarre satirical approach, the Internet in all its insanity is probably it.

In the beginning of the 20th century when visual-art collage was developed into a more specific art form (the act of gluing paper and other materials in artworks and decorations is supposedly much older than that, but artists like Picasso caused a more popular defined resurgence in the method's use), there was resistance and criticism from traditionalists. That seems to be an ongoing problem that artists of all kinds often encounter, especially the more innovative ones. Sometimes you've just gotta wait a while till the rest of the world (hopefully) catches up with you....

Thomas Basbøll said...

I've got a piece in Fascicle that addresses the collage-like nature of Flarf.

http://www.fascicle.com/issue01/Poets/basbollcheese.htm

I don't think Flarf collage or satire (and certainly not a satire of its Internet sources). Albers' "interaction studies" were not collages of their sources, and certainly not satirical.

But I'm in the minority here. Even some of the poets and some their blurbs are taking the irony/satire line. And as a first approximation maybe satirical collage is not so far off.

Still, I think the most powerful effect of Flarf is the one you take "straight".